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    HomeEntertainmentMusicA review of 'O.G Unkle Killz' by rapper Ikechukwu

    A review of 'O.G Unkle Killz' by rapper Ikechukwu

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    ‘O.G Unkle Killz’ offers quintessential parts of Ikechukwu‘s artistry.

    On his sixth album ‘O.G Unkle. Killz’, Ikechukwu rolls back the years as he delivers the packed bars of an OG rapper and the leisurely bop of an artist making music for himself.

    Over a decade later, hip hop is making a full circle moment in the mainstream courtesy of rappers like Odumodublvck and Ikechukuw AKA Killz is on this journey as well, albeit a personal and celebratory one.

    Like his illustrious peers Illbliss and Reminisce, Ikechukwu ventured into movies where he made strides, and like them, he makes his way back to hip hop which remains their first love.

    Killz is a rapper whose talent is influenced by two worlds. One of the rappers who brought the Western swagger into Nigerian hip hop, his chest thumping is molded after American rap icons. An Igbo man, Killz has always embraced his roots, whether it be yelling out his Igbo name in his breakout single or choosing to sometimes rap with an Igbo accent.

    On ‘O.G Unkle Killz’ offers music that carries markers of both worlds with heavy boom-bap production that is balanced with breezy reggae-dancehall exploration.

    Like most rappers who have consistently made music on their terms, Killz spends a lot of time thumping his chest and celebrating his success. He boasts about living life on his terms, his phenomenal life, and his exploits away from the rap scene like finding a Queen on ‘Phenomenal’ where the Praiz vocals recreate the template for hip hop classics.

    Killz talks about his luxurious life on ‘Investor’ with fellow Igbo rap great Illbliss who is Nigeria’s poster artist for luxury rap. He restates his success on ‘Fast Cars’ where Vector‘s chest-thumping is hidden in his witty lines.

    Killz has a couple of things on his mind. Ahead of his album release, he talked to Media Personality Daddy Fresh about business deals that went bad and losing close relationships, He explores some of these personal subjects on the introspective ‘White Givenchys’ whose production mirrors Timberland’s production on ‘Say Something’. Although the song had enough space left to fit in a 16 bar from an M.I Abaga or Phyno, perhaps the only reason Killz chose to go solo on the record was due to its personal subject matters.

    A student of the game Kilzz set out to craft tracks that are a hip-hop purist dream. Like the quintessential rapper, he has little tolerance for fakers and he makes this clear on the tamely produced ‘Brimstone’ where he also shows some political consciousness. He recruits seasoned lyricist Jesse Jagz who joined him in crowning Killz an Emperor. Jagz again stole the show on ‘Timing’ where the production could have used some sampling to save it from its striking mundanity.

    Killz punctuated the album with a breezy exploration of Reggae Dancehall starting with the bouncy Dancehall drums of ‘Touch Your Head’ where Jesse Jagz lays patois bars. The chilly production, carefree melodies, and reggae flows of ‘Breeze’ as Killz making music for his amusement while simultaneously showing his versatility and ability to offer something that slays a stark contrast to the mainstream.

    His leisurely flows shine ‘4 U’ and the windy ‘Breeze Mashup’ and ‘Breeze’ refix where Skales, Falz, and Vector elevate the utility of the chilly record.

    Even amidst his boom-bap hip-hop fiesta and breezy reggae-dancehall exploration, Killz still had time for experimentation. He took a trip back to 2000s Afrobeats on the dance record ‘Mercy’ whose production is reminiscent of the Mohit hitmaking era and which reminds listeners that he was there at the beginning and why he’s the OG Uncle Killz.

    ‘O.G Unkle Killz’ packs rap cuts that speak to Killlz’s time and status in the game. Although the boom-bap productions on some of the records like ‘Timing’, ‘Fast Cars’, and ‘Brimstone’ are underwhelmingly plain and uneventful, they serve their respective purposes.

    Punctuating the album midway with a smooth reggae-dancehall exploration also offered variety without steering the album off course.

    Overall, the album offers quintessential parts of Ikechukwu whose unflinching self-belief in his ability continues to define his music and drive his phenomenal life.

    Pulse Rating: /10

    Album Sequencing: 1.6/2

    Songwriting, Themes, and Delivery: 1.5/2

    Production: 1.3/2

    Enjoyability and Satisfaction: 1.4/2

    Execution: 1.5/2

    TOTAL – 7.3

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